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WOW – Thank You!

This is Dane Findley; I see you just sent a tip to my tip jar and I want you to know I deeply appreciate your contribution to the Over Fifty and Fit site.

You help keep the lights on, and your thoughtfulness is indeed making a positive difference.

I hope you find the following three workouts useful. They are my favorites of all time.

Why are these 3 workouts my favorite? Because they work! They help make the human body trim, strong, and flexible. (Plus, they’re a lot of fun to do.)

All of these workouts are for men and women.

You can modify any exercise to match the current mobility of your joints and your fitness level.

Workout #1: My All-Time Favorite Fat-Burning Circuit Session

Sometimes I call this workout “Sprint Day,” but, really, it’s a series of speed and agility drills that strengthen and condition the entire body while – and I love this part – burning an ASTOUNDING amount of calories.

Circuit training is a combination of several exercises (intervals) performed with short rest periods between them.

One circuit is when all of the chosen exercises have been completed.

Multiple circuits can be performed in one training session.

How many times you go through each circuit is determined by your current fitness level:

  • Beginners = 2x each circuit
  • Intermediates = 3x each circuit
  • Advanced Athletes = 4x each circuit.

How many repetitions (“reps”) you do is up to you, but 12 is a good number to shoot for. If you’re a beginner, do fewer. If you’re advanced, do more.

The intensity level for a circuit training session is typically higher than a standard gym workout.

I like to do my circuit training outdoors when possible. It’s challenging, but it can be a lot of fun.

CIRCUIT A

– Jog backward

– Jog forward

– Grapevine (each direction)

– Side shuffle (each direction)

– Jump rope

CIRCUIT B

– Skips

– Butt kicks

– Knee ups

– Jog backward

CIRCUIT C

– Sprint light

– Iron cross

– Single-leg hops

– Jog backward

CIRCUIT D

– Faster sprint

– Frog jumps

CIRCUIT E

– Kickovers

– Side Jumpovers

– Hopscotch backward

– Speed ladder

– Fastest sprint

BONUS FINISHER (optional)

– Climb outdoor stairs

TIPS

  • Your first sprint is done at 55% of maximum capacity;
  • Your second sprint is done at 65% of maximum capacity;
  • Your third sprint is done at 75% of maximum capacity.

When you finish your sprint, be sure to decelerate gradually so that you don’t trip.

Jogging backward is very good for you (which is why it appears 3 times in this workout).

When you do single-leg hops, I encourage you to be extra conscientious.

Pay close attention to how your feet land (you don’t want to roll an ankle).

WORKOUT #2: Best Upper-Body Circuit

I call this workout “Torso Day.”

It strengthens and defines the upper body.

For this workout, it helps to have access to some monkey bars. And, if you have a resistance band, that’s good too.

I use a jump rope, but that’s optional – you could just as easily jump in place.

Once again, how many times you go through each circuit is determined by your current fitness level:

  • Beginners = 2x each circuit
  • Intermediates = 3x each circuit
  • Advanced Athletes = 4x each circuit.

How many repetitions (“reps”) you do is up to you, but 12 is a good number to shoot for. If you’re a beginner, do fewer. If you’re advanced, do more.

CIRCUIT A

– Face-Up Row (for the back muscles)

– Leaning Push-Up (for the lower pecs)

– Hanging Knee Raise (for the lower abdominals)

– Jump Rope (for conditioning)

CIRCUIT B

– Pull-Up

– Decline Push-Up (feet up on bench; for upper pecs)

– Side Dip Plank (for the obliques)

CIRCUIT C

– Handstand Push-Up (for the deltoids)

– Chin-Up (back and biceps)

– Dip (chest and triceps)

– Resistance-Band Pullover (for the lats)

CIRCUIT D

– Parallel-Bar Push-Up (chest)

– Resistance-Band Bent-Over Fly (for posterior deltoids)

– Resistance-Band Arm Curl (biceps)

– Close-Stance Triangle Push-Up (triceps)

– Sit-Up (abs)

TIPS

  • If pull-ups are too hard for you at this point, put your foot in a resistance band to give you a boost, or, have a partner give you a spot, or, do jump-up pull-ups one at a time.
  • If handstand push-ups are too difficult right now, Simply keep your feet on the ground, or, halfway up the wall.
  • If you don’t have access to parallel bars or monkey bars, do regular push-ups on the ground.

WORKOUT #3: Lower-Body Blitz!

This is my leg day workout, outdoors. It strengthens and defines the lower body.

To offset the fact that you’re not lifting heavily plated barbells or using machines, the volume is increased (the number of exercises), and extra attention is paid to excellent technique (which means: good form, full range of motion, and a peak contraction within each rep).

For this workout, if you have a resistance band, that can be helpful. Or, if you have kettlebells or dumbbells, those can be used in place of the resistance band.

Once again, how many times you go through each circuit is determined by your current fitness level: • Beginners = 2x each circuit • Intermediates = 3x each circuit • Advanced Athletes = 4x each circuit.

How many repetitions (“reps”) you do is up to you, but 12 is a good number to shoot for. If you’re a beginner, do fewer. If you’re advanced, do more.

CIRCUIT A (warm-up)

– Alternating forward lunge (on a platform)

– Standing bicycle

– Standing heel raise

– Alternating step-up

– Sit squat.

CIRCUIT B

– Box jump

– Banded Straight-leg deadlift

– Banded squat

– Hanging knee raise.

CIRCUIT C

– Stationary side-to-side lunge

– 3-part 90-second plank (elbow plank/push-up plank/alternating leg lift)

– Reverse lunge

– Single-leg heel raise

– Banded crab walk.

CIRCUIT D

– 40 jumping jacks

– Banded arm press (for oblique stabilization)

– Banded woodchopper

– Side lunge on platform.

– Sit-up (or crunch).

CIRCUIT E

– Front squat with elevated heels

– 3-part single-leg glute bridge (hip thrust/pulse/inner-thigh opener)

– Single-leg step up (on a higher platform).

COOL-DOWN STRETCH

– Elevated pigeon.

TIPS

  • For sit squats, there is a one-second pause at the bottom of each squat during which you “sit,” and yet core and glute muscles remain activated.
  • For the banded deadlift, your leg can remain mostly straight. Try to initate this movement from your hamstrings.
  • For the stationary side-to-side lunge, keep the entire soles of your feet pushing down into the ground at all times.
  • Use your phone’s timer for the 90-second plank (30 seconds for each part).
  • For heel raises, exaggerate the range of motion and contract the muscle fibers intensely within your calf at the top of each repetition.

As always, I encourage you to consult your medical doctor before making any significant changes to your movement patterns or exercise habits.